Saving Money – Shopping at Salvage Grocery Stores

We’ve all thought, from time to time, there must be some way to spend less on groceries because these prices are just too high. We all have those times when suddenly our grocery budget is not as big as it needs to be. Shopping at a salvage grocery store can save you money.

When my children were young we had several tactics to save on groceries:

a. We clipped coupons

b. We kept a grocery price book to track the cost per ounce of groceries we bought.

c. We shopped the grocery store sales & bought the good deals.

d. We bought bread at the day old thrift stores.

e. When we found one, we went shopping at salvage grocery stores.

There was something heartwarming about buying a $3.00 box of cereal for $1.00 to $1.50 and it really saved our family with six of us to feed. We didn’t care if the box had a crunched corner or a rip in the cardboard because we only ate from the sealed liner inside.

Buying our cans of beans, corn and fruit for 1/2 the store prices was great, even if, some of the cans were dented or had a tear in a label. What counted to us was what was inside the can.

What counted most of all to me, when shopping at a salvage grocery store, was when we checked out. We were always surprised out how little we had spent on our cart full of groceries.

How do you find a salvage grocery store? In the past people usually found these stores through word of mouth. Usually a discount grocery lets their bargain pricing spread through word of mouth or small ads in neighborhood papers. We have a new directory at discountgroceryandmore.com where we list all the salvage and discount groceries nationwide for free.

Is it safe to buy discount or salvage groceries? As people shop at my store I see two kinds of people. Customer A may look for an expiration date and never buy anything that is out of date at all. Customer B either, never looks at these dates or simply makes sure the item is not more than a year out of date.

Expiration Dates

There is a little confusion about these dates. The only things Federally required to be discard on certain dates are baby formula and baby foods. Other items with dates like best if used by and use before or best flavor if used by dates are put there by the manufacturer. This is done to either cause the grocer to price food so it sells or as a means to rotate stock.

Most of us have out of date foods in our cupboards we’ve been consuming over the years without realizing it. Some things like milk and potato chips do go stale after going past their expiration by a few days or a few weeks. Canned foods usually last a long time past these dates as do many boxed foods.

What about dented cans? Usually a small dent is not a concern. The only dents that concern the USDA, who regulates these stores, are dents of the seals on the top of a can or on a side seam. I have eaten many of these cans of, not allowed to be sold food. I have had only one can I opened that was bad. I have occasionally thrown away a couple cans that were bulging as we sorted through a load of groceries.

There are a lot of these groceries that turn up in food pantries through agreements with, and, or donations from food chains. There are some food pantries setting up their own stores to buy these groceries and provide them to the folks who need them desperately.

If you have never shopped at a discount grocery, try one, you may be pleasantly surprised. If you have questions or concerns just ask the owners and their employees. They will be glad to help you. Most salvage stores I know of have a, it’s no problem attitude, if you ever buy something that doesn’t meet your expectation, they’ll exchange it or refund your money.

Buying a Salvage Car

Buying salvage cars is not for everyone, but if you want to put a little time into it, you can really get a great deal on a high-end car. Think of it like buying a fixer-upper home. The home may be in the perfect location and the right size, but needs a kitchen remodel and an upgrade to the landscape. If you are handy with tools, you can give it a go yourself and in time you will get it looking really nice. You could also higher a few contractors and have it in tip-top condition before you even move in.

Salvage cars work the same way. You may not be able to afford a brand new Lexus SUV, but you can a salvage title Lexus. If you look for a vehicle that has mainly body damage and minor engine repair, after a few days at the shop, you could have a vehicle in tip-top shape.

Maybe you are the do-it-yourselfer. Then salvage title cars are just for you. You can get excellent deals on cars and feed your addiction to cars by fixing it up. You can even get parts from your dealer or from a local salvage yard.

Can you get it re-titled?

Yes, each state has its own salvage car rules and regulation. Check with your local DMV for the process to re-title your salvage car.

Things to Look for when Buying Salvage Cars

Obviously the less damaged the car is the easier it will be to fix, however, the more expensive it will be. You want to look for vehicles with body damage and preferably in the backend. Do note, that any car that has been in an accident will most likely need engine repair. The jolt from the impact often shakes parts loose and possibly damages them.

Often you will find repo or theft recovery vehicles. These are good deals since the damage on them can be very minimal.

In any event, a salvage car can allow you to buy a luxury or exotic car at the price of a used Honda, but buyers beware. You will have to invest in repairs, and just like remolding a house, you can run into unexpected problems.

Auto Insurance for Salvaged Vehicles

Any vehicle that has been previously totaled (the repairs cost more than the value of the vehicle) and then returned to a safe, operational condition is considered salvaged. Most often, it is not immediately apparent whether a vehicle has been salvaged without checking the registration. It is, therefore, important when shopping for a used vehicle, to do a thorough check of the registration and check for mechanical signs of repair. When insuring a salvaged vehicle, there are a number of things to consider.

To begin with, consider if the vehicle is safe. Many salvaged vehicles are repaired by part time mechanics at privately own garages. This can create a number of safety concerns when the vehicle is in operation. It is important to double check all work done to be sure proper parts have been used and no short cuts taken. It is also important to never drive a vehicle that has parts installed which were meant for another year, make or model. If you are involved in an insurance claim and it is found out that improper parts were installed, they may deny the claim if they determine these incorrect automotive parts was the cause of the claim.

Moreover, consider that most auto insurance companies will only pay half the fair market value on a salvaged vehicle in the event of a claim. This is a somewhat controversial practice, but lawful. If a vehicle is salvaged, that means it has been totaled in the past. This is because the fair market value of the vehicle has been compensated at least once already and should not be again. Insurance is not meant to overcompensate or improve the financial standing of an individual, it is meant to bring them back to even when faced with a loss.

When purchasing a vehicle with a salvaged title, it is important to first consider the overall mechanical integrity of the car, as failing to do so can result in an insurance provider refusing to pay a claim. If improper parts have been installed on a vehicle, or if inadequate work has been done to restore a salvaged vehicle, it can cause problems when purchasing insurance or when filing a claim. Secondly, it is important to consider the way in which insurance companies offer insurance for salvaged titled vehicles, as it can be different from insuring a car with a clean title. As salvaged cars typically cost less, and are generally worth less, insurers deal with them in a different manner.