Salvage Drums – The Versatile Solution For Storing and Transporting Hazardous Chemicals

Do you need a way to store chemicals of various kinds? Do you have soiled clean-up materials? Salvage drums are the perfect solution. Read on for their various uses, and what to look for when you want to make sure you’re selecting the right kind.

Salvage drums are very versatile. They’re suited to all sorts of uses and chemicals. For example, you may need to store soiled chemicals or clean-up materials until you can dispose of them safely. Or you might want to store used acids, dry cleaning compounds, pool chemicals, dyes, strippers, solvents, and other hazardous chemicals that result from the work you do. They will also help you comply with various federal and state regulations.

But serving as a holding place for soiled cleaning material is just one of their uses. They can also be used for transportation, including as original shipping containers, and when they are used for transporting chemicals, they’ll help you comply with DOT 49 CFR regulations. They can even serve as spill containment for other containers.

There are many types of companies that have — or should have — salvage drums on hand. They include medical facilities, labs, factories and warehouses, transportation companies as well as, of course, spill clean up companies.

What should you be looking for when you’re shopping for salvage drums? First of all, make sure they’re resistant to chemicals as well as inclement weather. Check that they comply with DOT regulations for transporting hazardous materials safely.

The drums also must meet a pressure test of 3 psi in order to comply with regulations. High quality drums should also have UV inhibitors, and are frequently made out of high density polypropylene.

You can get salvage drums in various sizes as well, from 20 gallons all the way to 95 gallons, and several sizes in between. The smaller ones generally have metal lever locks, and the larger ones have metal bolt bans. Lids should have a closed cell foam gasket for additional safety.

How to Shop For Car Parts Using Junkyards and Salvage Yards

Cheap cars and Junkyards pretty much go hand in hand. Now of course there are a million places to get parts from new and used from eBay to your local parts store. In the age of limitless online suppliers and a world wide parts market I think a lot of part shoppers have forgotten about using the local salvage yard as a parts alternative.

I think that for some amateur wrenchers the salvage yard can seem like a somewhat intimidating kind of place to be. Thoughts of pit bulls and a big fella named skeeter may come to mind ( no offense to any salvage yard owners named skeeter), but actually they can be a great place to quickly and easily locate used parts. Most salvage yards these days tend to have a cataloged and computerized inventory so really finding out if they have what you need can be as simple as making a phone call.

Personally I much rather prefer the yards that are willing to simply let you browse around on your own. These yards can also be a good spot to find some better prices, because in some cases a little haggling can be done. If your looking to make a trip to one of these “you pick you pull” type yards its a good idea to take a few steps to come prepared.

First bring some tools of course! Usually a decent enough socket set, some screwdrivers, and a set of vice-grips will get the job done and not be too heavy to carry around. In some cases bringing a jack may be necessary, but some yards are willing to provide jacks and engine hoists or at least rent them. If bringing any power tools, torches, or other equipment its a good idea to check with the owner first. Also its a good idea to wear some old clothes, a pair of boots, and some thick gloves (lots of old rusty debris can be a hazard and most yards tend to get pretty muddy and can have some really over grown grass).

After finding the right part, some may be concerned about how they know that the part is going to be in good enough condition to reuse. Honestly it really depends on the part and a lot of other variables, but in most cases yard owners are willing to provide some type of warranty or guarantee.

So the next time you decide to purchase a used car part don’t forget that there could be a great deal waiting for you at your local yard and the shopping experience itself can be pretty fun too!

Learn What Should You Do to Sell a Car for Salvage?

Unwanted or junked cars initially tend to be a source of problems. From being an eyesore, an environmental problem to a legal issue, there is potential money in the disposal of said vehicle. To learn what you should do to sell a car for salvage is a quick way to solve any of those problems.

Potential treasure
There have been many documented discoveries of valuables hidden away in or as what others may term junk so it is best to start by investigating the car itself. No one wants to give away a classic that may be worth way more than what it was sold for. Even if the vehicle may not be important to the owner, there may be persons or clubs to whom it might.

Make sure you own it
After determining the relative value of the car, confirm that all the paperwork is current and correct. Check to make sure the title reflects the ownership and conforms to the specifications of the vehicle itself, such as make, model, year, and VIN numbers. The reasons for this are to avoid any legal issues relating to the sale later and for tax time recordkeeping.

Clean it up
Before you start looking for buyers, go through the vehicle for any important or valuable personal items. A key element is whether the car is running or not. This can help to determine if it’s worth the effort to go further in the cleaning process. A good general wash can either hurt or increase the salvage value, however, most recyclers shouldn’t care as it just depends on what they’re planning to do with the vehicle. A general scrapper will simply rip everything out to be crushed. Some yards look at the car on a part-by-part basis where the quality of individual elements such as the engine, is important. Those with an eco-friendly vibe may want to remove fluids such as oil, coolant and gasoline as well.

Shop around
If the car is running it may be cost-effective to drive it around to local recyclers to gauge the general selling price. If it is unable to be driven, many scrap yards offer towing services and are willing to visit the location of the vehicle and perform an inspection there. Calling around and giving recyclers a general idea of the vehicle works just as well since most of them have preset prices based on a per-pound scale. An extra tip is to try and locate salvage yards that specialize in that particular brand or model. If all else fails then there’s the internet.

Sold
If the transaction is being completed by check, make sure to get all the information of the buyer. If by cash, count it in plain view to ensure it’s the agreed amount. Should the car be sold to a charity, use the check or receipt to look into tax credits?