Salvaged Vehicles Save You Money

Most people don’t even know what the words salvaged vehicle means. When you first say it, they think of a car or truck sitting in a junk yard rusting away. This may be true to a point, however, what kind of salvaged vehicle I speak of is a whole new kind. Let me explain. The average person would not think about driving a car that…well, was wrecked then salvaged. With the newer cars and trucks that are involved in accidents everyday and get salvaged all the time thanks to our high cost of labor at the dealers for repairs. You can be driving one of them (after being repaired) for super cheap. You see, insurance companies have a standard way of doing their estimations of repairs for the vehicles that are in an accident. They have to replace all the broken parts with what is called OEM parts that come from the dealers who get them from the manufacturer. With the labor rate of our union workers, the parts are out of site in cost to repair a vehicle back to the insurances standards. Not to mention the labor rates at a dealerships body shop for repairs as well. So when a vehicle costs more than 75% of the book value to be repaired, they just total the car and have it salvaged. The Insurance Company then writes a check out to the owner for the amount the vehicle is worth at the time of the accident.

Now this brings us to why salvaged vehicles save you money. You see, a vehicle can be repaired for a lot less than what is quoted from Insurance companies. (You wonder why we pay so much for insurance.) The parts that are readily available are much like going shopping for anything else. There are choices for parts with better prices and they will do the job just as well as OEM parts. Why pay $300-$400 dollars for a fender on a car when you can get one just as good for $50 dollars. See the savings? This is just one aspect of the whole deal. You can save thousands of dollars when repairing a salvaged vehicle. If you can’t do the work, then let the Pro people do it. So next time you are looking for a good used car, think real hard on finding a newer low mile salvaged car that can be repaired. It will save you a lot of money.

Auto Insurance for Salvaged Vehicles

Any vehicle that has been previously totaled (the repairs cost more than the value of the vehicle) and then returned to a safe, operational condition is considered salvaged. Most often, it is not immediately apparent whether a vehicle has been salvaged without checking the registration. It is, therefore, important when shopping for a used vehicle, to do a thorough check of the registration and check for mechanical signs of repair. When insuring a salvaged vehicle, there are a number of things to consider.

To begin with, consider if the vehicle is safe. Many salvaged vehicles are repaired by part time mechanics at privately own garages. This can create a number of safety concerns when the vehicle is in operation. It is important to double check all work done to be sure proper parts have been used and no short cuts taken. It is also important to never drive a vehicle that has parts installed which were meant for another year, make or model. If you are involved in an insurance claim and it is found out that improper parts were installed, they may deny the claim if they determine these incorrect automotive parts was the cause of the claim.

Moreover, consider that most auto insurance companies will only pay half the fair market value on a salvaged vehicle in the event of a claim. This is a somewhat controversial practice, but lawful. If a vehicle is salvaged, that means it has been totaled in the past. This is because the fair market value of the vehicle has been compensated at least once already and should not be again. Insurance is not meant to overcompensate or improve the financial standing of an individual, it is meant to bring them back to even when faced with a loss.

When purchasing a vehicle with a salvaged title, it is important to first consider the overall mechanical integrity of the car, as failing to do so can result in an insurance provider refusing to pay a claim. If improper parts have been installed on a vehicle, or if inadequate work has been done to restore a salvaged vehicle, it can cause problems when purchasing insurance or when filing a claim. Secondly, it is important to consider the way in which insurance companies offer insurance for salvaged titled vehicles, as it can be different from insuring a car with a clean title. As salvaged cars typically cost less, and are generally worth less, insurers deal with them in a different manner.

What Is A Salvage Grocery Store?

A salvage grocery store specializes in selling off products sent back to the grocery warehouse by a store or excess inventory sold to a liquidator by a manufacturer. Sometimes the stores are called scratch and dent stores, dented can stores or discount grocery stores.

Sometimes undamaged grocery items become salvage because their use by date was getting close, or because the item just didn’t sell well in that area. Hot Peppers may sell well in New Mexico and Texas, but not so well in New England. Sometimes the reason the item becomes salvage is seasonal. Lots of Halloween stuff shows up in November, and Christmas stuff shows up in January. Sometimes it’s a misspelled label or a product overrun. In any case, all the groceries are checked for quality by the liquidation center and by our staff at Discount Groceries and More.

Where do salvage groceries come from?

Accidents happen, even in the grocery business. If a case of green beans gets dropped, or hit by a forklift and a couple of cans get bent, those cans (and sometimes the whole case) don’t make it to the grocery store shelves. Instead, they’re sent to a reclamation center, where broken jars are discarded, cans with leaks are destroyed, etc. The rest of the products (the good stuff) are then shipped to a distributor, who then ships the salvage grocery products to a salvage grocery store.

What kind of stuff will you find at a salvage grocery store?

To really sum it up, a salvage (discount) grocery is a place where you will always find unexpected treasures. This week there may be an awesome deal on something that’s not there next week. You may be the one who picks up the last bag of the gourmet coffee for a song or not. You’ll find name brand cereals with a crunched corner or a packing knife cut on a box but still a bargain for $1.49. The big box stores can’t sell you the box with a crunched corner for $5.00 so they ship it off to an liquidator who puts together pallet loads of these groceries to sell to retailers across the country.

Usually you’ll be talking to the owner of the store or their friendly helper. No big city rush here like in the Wal-Mart or at the big box stores. Need help, just ask.

Salvage grocery stores are regulated and inspected by the USDA. This means each owner is cognizant on what can be sold and what can’t be sold. We are taught how recognize foods that are or are not safe.

What about foods that are past the Best if used by date?

The Best if used by date is the date recommended for best taste or flavor. This is how long the manufacturer wants their goods on display but usually foods will be good for, in some cases, many months beyond these dates. If most of us would check our shelves and pantries, we’d find that we’ve been eating many foods which technically have expired without knowing it.

They only foods required to have expiration dates are baby foods and infant formulas.