Auto Insurance for Salvaged Vehicles

Any vehicle that has been previously totaled (the repairs cost more than the value of the vehicle) and then returned to a safe, operational condition is considered salvaged. Most often, it is not immediately apparent whether a vehicle has been salvaged without checking the registration. It is, therefore, important when shopping for a used vehicle, to do a thorough check of the registration and check for mechanical signs of repair. When insuring a salvaged vehicle, there are a number of things to consider.

To begin with, consider if the vehicle is safe. Many salvaged vehicles are repaired by part time mechanics at privately own garages. This can create a number of safety concerns when the vehicle is in operation. It is important to double check all work done to be sure proper parts have been used and no short cuts taken. It is also important to never drive a vehicle that has parts installed which were meant for another year, make or model. If you are involved in an insurance claim and it is found out that improper parts were installed, they may deny the claim if they determine these incorrect automotive parts was the cause of the claim.

Moreover, consider that most auto insurance companies will only pay half the fair market value on a salvaged vehicle in the event of a claim. This is a somewhat controversial practice, but lawful. If a vehicle is salvaged, that means it has been totaled in the past. This is because the fair market value of the vehicle has been compensated at least once already and should not be again. Insurance is not meant to overcompensate or improve the financial standing of an individual, it is meant to bring them back to even when faced with a loss.

When purchasing a vehicle with a salvaged title, it is important to first consider the overall mechanical integrity of the car, as failing to do so can result in an insurance provider refusing to pay a claim. If improper parts have been installed on a vehicle, or if inadequate work has been done to restore a salvaged vehicle, it can cause problems when purchasing insurance or when filing a claim. Secondly, it is important to consider the way in which insurance companies offer insurance for salvaged titled vehicles, as it can be different from insuring a car with a clean title. As salvaged cars typically cost less, and are generally worth less, insurers deal with them in a different manner.

Using Architectural Props in Your Flower Shop

A very classy and modern way to accent your floral merchandise is to use architectural props for your backgrounds. You might ask what architectural props are. These kinds of accents are old, recycled pieces of buildings, such as windows, window frames, doors, etc. Here are ten ideas and ways to implement architectural features in your flower shop.

1. A salvaged fireplace mantle could make a fabulous focal point in your shop.

2. Stained glass windows would be an excellent way to accentuate your floral goods. You could put a price tag on the stained glass and sell the piece or just keep the prop for display.

3. A Victorian screen door is a superior backdrop for a large dried flower wreath and blooming plants. Tuck the screen door in and about baskets, green and blooming plants, and other dried flowers. Very nice!

4. Wrought iron gates leaned against the wall is a fine way to displays silk and dried swags or wreaths. Also, hang dried flower bunches on gates and wrought iron fencing. Similarly, old barn wood can be fashioned into benches for the blooming and green plants in your flower shop as well as backdrops for country products and signs.

5. Old salvaged front doors are a lovely architectural accent. Once again use to display wreaths and swags or as an ornamental backdrop.

6. Windows with glass add a unique backdrop for merchandise in your shop. Hang in and around products you want to highlight. Furthermore, you can put the window on a tall easel and display a magnificent wreath you have created.

7. Windows without glass that have been rescued are just as much a splendid accent piece as windows with glass. These can be painted wild and bright colors or soft, muted tints. Whatever you need to highlight, the windows can be made to order. Several of them painted Christmas red and displaying evergreen wreaths would be a nice way to merchandise the fresh wreaths during the Christmas holiday season.

8. Old recovered garden fountains and statuettes could put an emphasis on your plants and garden items. If the fountain really worked that would be extraordinary.

9. Reclaimed stone could be used to make a garden path leading up to a water fountain. Not salvaged, but new fountains are readily available. The sound of water in a flower shop is quite enjoyable; tranquil, and soothing.

10. Salvaged wooden cabinets, chairs, and shelves are very useful in displays. These can be used to display gift items and basket gardens. It is a way to get your merchandise off the floor. Check your local salvage yards. Keep your eye out at yard sales, thrift store, and flea markets for architectural props to use in your flower shop. Remember, making your floral shop a one of its kind makes it distinctive.

How to Shop For Car Parts Using Junkyards and Salvage Yards

Cheap cars and Junkyards pretty much go hand in hand. Now of course there are a million places to get parts from new and used from eBay to your local parts store. In the age of limitless online suppliers and a world wide parts market I think a lot of part shoppers have forgotten about using the local salvage yard as a parts alternative.

I think that for some amateur wrenchers the salvage yard can seem like a somewhat intimidating kind of place to be. Thoughts of pit bulls and a big fella named skeeter may come to mind ( no offense to any salvage yard owners named skeeter), but actually they can be a great place to quickly and easily locate used parts. Most salvage yards these days tend to have a cataloged and computerized inventory so really finding out if they have what you need can be as simple as making a phone call.

Personally I much rather prefer the yards that are willing to simply let you browse around on your own. These yards can also be a good spot to find some better prices, because in some cases a little haggling can be done. If your looking to make a trip to one of these “you pick you pull” type yards its a good idea to take a few steps to come prepared.

First bring some tools of course! Usually a decent enough socket set, some screwdrivers, and a set of vice-grips will get the job done and not be too heavy to carry around. In some cases bringing a jack may be necessary, but some yards are willing to provide jacks and engine hoists or at least rent them. If bringing any power tools, torches, or other equipment its a good idea to check with the owner first. Also its a good idea to wear some old clothes, a pair of boots, and some thick gloves (lots of old rusty debris can be a hazard and most yards tend to get pretty muddy and can have some really over grown grass).

After finding the right part, some may be concerned about how they know that the part is going to be in good enough condition to reuse. Honestly it really depends on the part and a lot of other variables, but in most cases yard owners are willing to provide some type of warranty or guarantee.

So the next time you decide to purchase a used car part don’t forget that there could be a great deal waiting for you at your local yard and the shopping experience itself can be pretty fun too!